Unmanageable

27 04 2011

“The secret things belong to the Lord our God, but the things revealed belong to us and to our sons forever…”
(Deuteronomy 29:29)

To admit that there is One who lies beyond us, Who exists outside all our categories, Who will not be dismissed with a name, Who will not appear before the bar of our reason, nor submit to our curious inquiries: this requires a great deal of humility, more than most of us possess, so we save face by thinking God down to our level, or at least down to where we can manage Him.

–A.W. Tozer, The Knowledge of the Holy





Whatever

6 10 2007

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“And they immediately left the nets and followed Him.”
(Matthew 4:20) 

“Lord, I am willing
To receive what You give,
To lack what You withhold,
To relinquish what You take,
To suffer what You inflict,
To be what You require.”

–from an ancient hymn
quoted in Jerry Bridge’s Transforming Grace, p185





Only God Is Great

25 06 2007

Ascending the throne at the age four, Louis XIV rules as king of France for 72 years, the longest reign in modern European history. Consumed with hiw own power, he called himself the “Greatlouisxiv.jpg Monarch” and declared, “I am the State!” But in 1715, King Louis XIV abdicated his throne to death.

His funeral was nothing short of spectacular. The great cathedral was packed with mourners paying final tribute to their king, who lay in a solid gold coffin. To dramatize the deceased ruler’s greatness, a solitary candle burned above his coffin. Thousands waited in hushed silence as they peered at the exquisite casket that held the mortal remains of their monarch.

At the appointed time the funeral service began, and Bishop Massillon, who presided over this official act of state, stood the address the mourners, including the assembled clergy of France. When the bishop rose, he did something that stunned the nation. Bending down from the pulpit, he snuffed out the lone candle representing Louis XIV’s greatness. The people gasped. Then in the darkness, came just four words from behind the open Bible:

“Only God is great!”

–Steven J. Lawson, Glory, quoted from Heartcry! Life Action Ministries’ Journal on Revival and Spiritual Awakening, Spring 2007, pp42-3.





Fasting for Life

12 05 2007

“But this kind does not go out but by prayer and fasting.”
(Matthew 17:21)

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When we fast, we are intentionally relinquishing the first right given to the human family in the Garden—the right to eat. We say no to food because we are intent upon others receiving a far greater nourishment. We are committed to breaking every yoke and setting the captives free. Our fasting is a sign that nothing will stop us in our struggle in behalf of the broken and oppressed.

We are depriving ourselves for the sake of a greater good. Our fasting has weight with God and effect upon others…Our fasting is part of our wrestling with God. It is part of the birth pangs we endure in order to see new life come forth.

–Richard Foster
Prayer: Finding Your Heart’s True Home, p226





Accompanied By Action

3 04 2007

“What good is it, my brothers, if a man claims to have faith but has no deeds? Can such faith save him? Suppose a brother or sister is without clothes and daily food. If one of you says to him, “Go, I wish you well; keep warm and well fed,” but does nothing about his physical needs, what good is it? In the same way, faith by itself, if it is not accompanied by action, is dead.”
(James 2:14-17)

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“True evangelical faith cannot lie dormant. It clothes the naked, it feeds the hungry, it comforts the sorrowful, it shelters the destitute, it serves those that harm it, it binds up that which is wounded, it has become all things to all people.”

–Menno Simons





Edwards’ Thoughts On Spiritual Pride

31 01 2007

“Do nothing from selfishness or empty conceit, but with humility of mind regard one another as more important than yourselves; do not merely look out for your own personal interests, but also for the interests of others.”
(Philippians 2:3,4)
“Therefore let him who thinks he stands take heed that he does not fall.”
(1 Corinthians 10:12)

Spiritual pride is very apt to suspect others; whereas an humble saint is most jealous of himself; he is so suspicious of nothing in the world as he is of his own heart. The spiritually proud person is apt to find fault with other saints that they are low in grace, and to be much in observing how jonathan_edwards.jpgcold and dead they are, and crying out against them for it, and to be quick to discern and take notice of their deficiencies, but the eminently humble Christian has much to do at home, and sees so much evil in his own heart, and is so concerned about it, that he is not apt to be very busy with others’ hearts; he complains most of himself and cries out of his own coldness and lowness in grace, and is apt to esteem others better than himself, and is ready to hope that there is nobody but has more love and thankfulness to God than he, and cannot bear to think that others should bring forth no more fruit to God’s honor than he.

–Jonathan Edwards